The Palya Art Online Gallery

Palya Art holds commercial exhibitions of works by emerging and established artists through Indigenous managed Art Centres.

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Contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details please or go to helen@palya.com.au Now a contemporary surface for artistic and cultural expression, the Lorrkon, as described by Maniningrida Arts and Culture below, is used traditionally as follows: LORRKKON - HOLLOW LOG OSSUARY The lorrkkon or bone pole coffin ceremony was the final cermony in a sequence of mortuary rituals celebrated by the people of Anhem Land. This ceremony involves the placing of the deceased’s bones into a hollow log, which was decorated with painted clan designs, and ceremonially placed into the ground where it remained until it slowly decayed over many years. The log is made from termite hollowed Stringy-bark tree (Eucalyptus tetadonta) and is decorated with totemic emblems. The western Arnhem Land version of the lorrkkon ceremony involves the singing of scared songs to the accompaniment of karlikarli, a pair of sacred boomerangs used as rhythm instruments. During the final evening of the ceremony, dancers decorate themselves with kapok down, or today, cotton wool and conduct much of the final segments of the ceremony in the secrecy of a restricted men’s’ camp. The complete ceremony may stretch over a period of two weeks. On the last night the bones of the deceased, which have been kept in a bark container or today wrapped in cloth and kept in a suitcase, are taken out, painted with red ochre and placed inside the hollow log. This ceremony may take place many years after the person has died. At first light on the final morning of the lorrkkon ceremony, the men appear, coming out of their secret bush camp carrying the pole towards the women’s’ camp. The two groups call to each other using distinct ceremonial calls. The women have prepared a hole for the pole be placed into and when it is stood upright, women in particular kinship relationships to the deceased dance around the pole in a jumping/shuffling motion. The lorrkkon is then often covered with a tarpaulin and left to slowly decay. Source: Maningrida Arts & Culture Please contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.auOn view in Melbourne: Please contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.au Now a contemporary surface for artistic and cultural expression, the Lorrkon, as described by Maniningrida Arts and Culture below, is used traditionally as follows: LORRKKON - HOLLOW LOG OSSUARY The lorrkkon or bone pole coffin ceremony was the final cermony in a sequence of mortuary rituals celebrated by the people of Anhem Land. This ceremony involves the placing of the deceased’s bones into a hollow log, which was decorated with painted clan designs, and ceremonially placed into the ground where it remained until it slowly decayed over many years. The log is made from termite hollowed Stringy-bark tree (Eucalyptus tetadonta) and is decorated with totemic emblems. The western Arnhem Land version of the lorrkkon ceremony involves the singing of scared songs to the accompaniment of karlikarli, a pair of sacred boomerangs used as rhythm instruments. During the final evening of the ceremony, dancers decorate themselves with kapok down, or today, cotton wool and conduct much of the final segments of the ceremony in the secrecy of a restricted men’s’ camp. The complete ceremony may stretch over a period of two weeks. On the last night the bones of the deceased, which have been kept in a bark container or today wrapped in cloth and kept in a suitcase, are taken out, painted with red ochre and placed inside the hollow log. This ceremony may take place many years after the person has died. At first light on the final morning of the lorrkkon ceremony, the men appear, coming out of their secret bush camp carrying the pole towards the women’s’ camp. The two groups call to each other using distinct ceremonial calls. The women have prepared a hole for the pole be placed into and when it is stood upright, women in particular kinship relationships to the deceased dance around the pole in a jumping/shuffling motion. The lorrkkon is then often covered with a tarpaulin and left to slowly decay. Source: Maningrida Arts & Culture Timothy Cook was born in 1958 and lives and works at Milikapiti on Melville Island. His country is Goose Creek, Melville Island, his skin group Marntupuni (House Fly) and dance Tarduwuli (Shark). A member of Jilamara Arts & Crafts Association, he began exhibiting his work in the late 1990s. Featuring circular and cross motifs, Cook’s paintings are strongly connected to aspects of Tiwi ceremonial practice, particularly the Kulama (yam ceremony) and Pukumani (funeral ceremony), as well as stories of Purukapali, one of the great mythological Tiwi ancestral figures. ... Cook has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally. In 2012 Cook won the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award and was a finalist in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. He was a finalist in the Togart Contemporary Art Award, Darwin (2010 and 2013); Kate Challis RAKA Award, Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (2013); Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth (2009 and 2011); Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award (2006); and the Shell Fremantle Print Award, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2002). His paintings are represented in numerous major public and private collections in Australia and internationally. Source Museum of Contemporary Art SydneyOn view in Melbourne. Please contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.auTimothy Cook was born in 1958 and lives and works at Milikapiti on Melville Island. His country is Goose Creek, Melville Island, his skin group Marntupuni (House Fly) and dance Tarduwuli (Shark). A member of Jilamara Arts & Crafts Association, he began exhibiting his work in the late 1990s. Featuring circular and cross motifs, Cook’s paintings are strongly connected to aspects of Tiwi ceremonial practice, particularly the Kulama (yam ceremony) and Pukumani (funeral ceremony), as well as stories of Purukapali, one of the great mythological Tiwi ancestral figures. ... Cook has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally. In 2012 Cook won the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award and was a finalist in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. He was a finalist in the Togart Contemporary Art Award, Darwin (2010 and 2013); Kate Challis RAKA Award, Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (2013); Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth (2009 and 2011); Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award (2006); and the Shell Fremantle Print Award, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2002). His paintings are represented in numerous major public and private collections in Australia and internationally. Source Museum of Contemporary Art SydneyA senior Gija man of Jungurra skin, Rammey Ramsey was born at Old Greenvale Station, which is now part of Bow River Station. His country is the area west of Bedford Downs near Elgee Cliffs. His Gija name Warlawoon is the general name for that area.   Rammey began painting for Jirrawun Arts in 2000 and continues to paint with Warmun Art Centre.   In addition to his painting, Rammey is also an inspired actor, dancer and teacher who performed in the Neminuwarlin Performance Group’s production of ‘Fire, Fire Burning Bright’, which featured in the Perth and Melbourne International Arts Festivals in 2002. In 2014, he was a finalist in the Alice Art Prize and recently exhibited in the project and touring exhibition ‘In the Saddle, On the Wall’.   Source: Warmun Art Centre  Mabel Juli was born circa 1933 at Five Mile, near Moola Boola Station south of Warmun, Western Australia and her language is Gija. As a young woman, she moved to Springvale Station, Bow River Station and Bedford Downs. Juli is the sister of Rusty Peters who is also an accomplished artist working at Jirrawun Arts in Wyndham. Mabel Juli is a senior Warmun artist; she is a strong Lore and Culture woman and an important ceremonial singer and dancer. Mabel Juli started painting in the mid 1980s, at the same time as well-known Warmun artists Queenie McKenzie who taught her to paint and Madigan Thomas. These female artists were encouraged to paint by Rover Thomas. Juli is a dedicated, innovative artist who continues to paint using earth pigments on canvas. She primarily paints the Ngarrangkarni (Dreaming) stories of her country Darrajayin, which is also covered largely by Springvale Station. As a young girl, Mabel Juli’s mother and father would often take her to their traditional lands; it was here that they taught her their stories Karnkiny (Moon Dreaming), Glingennayn and Old Woman Singing Out for Her Dog (Marranji and Jiyirinny) that also feature in her work. Source Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi A senior Gija man of Jungurra skin, Rammey Ramsey was born at Old Greenvale Station, which is now part of Bow River Station. His country is the area west of Bedford Downs near Elgee Cliffs. His Gija name Warlawoon is the general name for that area.   Rammey began painting for Jirrawun Arts in 2000 and continues to paint with Warmun Art Centre.   In addition to his painting, Rammey is also an inspired actor, dancer and teacher who performed in the Neminuwarlin Performance Group’s production of ‘Fire, Fire Burning Bright’, which featured in the Perth and Melbourne International Arts Festivals in 2002. In 2014, he was a finalist in the Alice Art Prize and recently exhibited in the project and touring exhibition ‘In the Saddle, On the Wall’.   Source: Warmun Art Centre  This Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) tells about the bush turkey. It is a big bird that flies around from place to place searching for food. They eat insects. The men hunt for the turkeys with boomerangs. The men hunt together to catch the turkeys. Warnayaka Artists with Lily Hargraves. ... Painting and singing; performance, the land and Law, are all connected, as Lily Yirringali Jurrah Nungurrayi Hargraves shows us in this, her articulating ‘Turkey Dreaming’ painting, above. A recent painting of Mrs. Hargraves, now in her late 80's Lily Nungarrayi Yirringali Jurrah Hargraves is a Walpiri artist and senior Law woman from Lajamanu in the Northern Territory. Lily was known as Maggie Jurrah Hargraves but prefers now to be known as Jurrah and best known as Lily Hargraves. Her Warlpiri name is Yirringali. A senior Warlpiri woman of striking force. Nungarrayi has created an extraordinary body of artwork and remains a sharp hunter-gatherer fine-tuned to the sensativities and demands of the Tanami Desert. Text: Helen Read March 2017 Weaver Jack Painting Snake Creek 2004. Weaver Jack spoke the Yulparitja Language and described this paintting saying 'This is the river, travelling water, kalyjarri is on one side, and Lungarung on the other. It is really bush country. This is walking around people. We used walk and camp all around this country'. Text Short Street Gallery Copyright for this painting and text remains with the artists, and may not be reproduced without permission from the artist or their representative.A senior Gija man of Jungurra skin, Rammey Ramsey was born at Old Greenvale Station, which is now part of Bow River Station. His country is the area west of Bedford Downs near Elgee Cliffs. His Gija name Warlawoon is the general name for that area.   Rammey began painting for Jirrawun Arts in 2000 and continues to paint with Warmun Art Centre.   In addition to his painting, Rammey is also an inspired actor, dancer and teacher who performed in the Neminuwarlin Performance Group’s production of ‘Fire, Fire Burning Bright’, which featured in the Perth and Melbourne International Arts Festivals in 2002. In 2014, he was a finalist in the Alice Art Prize and recently exhibited in the project and touring exhibition ‘In the Saddle, On the Wall’.   Source: Warmun Art Centre  Taken and edited from Wikipedia: Tjayanka Woods is an Australian Aboriginal artist. She was one of the pioneers of the art movement across the Ngaanyatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara lands, which began in 2000. She is best known for her paintings, but also a craftswoman who makes baskets and other woven artworks. Her paintings are held in the Art Gallery of Western Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and the National Gallery of Australia. Woods was born about 1935. She was born close to Kaḻayapiṯi, a rock hole in the Great Victoria Desert of South Australia. She grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life in the bush with her family, before any contact with Euro-Australian society. They often camped at Kaḻayapiṯi, and Woods and the other girls would gather bushfoodtogether. She learned to carve basic tools and decorative objects, and to burn traditional patterns into the wood (this is called puṉu. She also learned to spin hair string on a hand-spun spindle and weave head rings and ceremonial belts from hair and feathers. Woods began painting in 2000, after moving to Irrunytju. The women there opened an art centre as a community-owned economic project, called Irrunytju Arts. From the beginning of her career, Brown often painted with her friend Anmanari Brown. When Brown's husband died in 2007, the two women left Irrunytju and went to live at Papulankutja, on Ngaanyatjarra lands. Here, they painted for Papulankutja Artists. In April 2010, the two women held their first solo exhibition together at the Vivien Anderson Gallery in Melbourne. Woods has had two of her paintings chosen as finalists for the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, in 2006 and 2008. Woods' paintings are mostly about the Minyma Kutjara Tjukurpa (Two Sisters Dreaming), which is her personal Dreaming. They are structured like maps drawn in the sand, tracing the journey of the two sisters around the edge of the canvas. She paints in earthy colours, and uses solid and dotted lines in concentric circles to depict the journeys and activities of figures in the story. Kuntjil Cooper is a Pitjantjatjara speaker and artist from the Wingellina area North West of South Australia. His definite outline paintings of country in pungent colour and characteristic hand has made his artwork highly recognisable. Thickly applied acrylic paint on often visibly roughened linen during the course of wear and tear of painting life in the community, Mr. Cooper was a memember of the Irrunitju painting group; now evolved into The Minyma Kutjara Arts Project. Taken and edited from Wikipedia: Tjayanka Woods is an Australian Aboriginal artist. She was one of the pioneers of the art movement across the Ngaanyatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara lands, which began in 2000. She is best known for her paintings, but also a craftswoman who makes baskets and other woven artworks. Her paintings are held in the Art Gallery of Western Australia, National Gallery of Victoria and the National Gallery of Australia. Woods was born about 1935. She was born close to Kaḻayapiṯi, a rock hole in the Great Victoria Desert of South Australia. She grew up living a traditional, nomadic way of life in the bush with her family, before any contact with Euro-Australian society. They often camped at Kaḻayapiṯi, and Woods and the other girls would gather bushfoodtogether. She learned to carve basic tools and decorative objects, and to burn traditional patterns into the wood (this is called puṉu. She also learned to spin hair string on a hand-spun spindle and weave head rings and ceremonial belts from hair and feathers. Woods began painting in 2000, after moving to Irrunytju. The women there opened an art centre as a community-owned economic project, called Irrunytju Arts. From the beginning of her career, Brown often painted with her friend Anmanari Brown. When Brown's husband died in 2007, the two women left Irrunytju and went to live at Papulankutja, on Ngaanyatjarra lands. Here, they painted for Papulankutja Artists. In April 2010, the two women held their first solo exhibition together at the Vivien Anderson Gallery in Melbourne. Woods has had two of her paintings chosen as finalists for the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award, in 2006 and 2008. Woods' paintings are mostly about the Minyma Kutjara Tjukurpa (Two Sisters Dreaming), which is her personal Dreaming. They are structured like maps drawn in the sand, tracing the journey of the two sisters around the edge of the canvas. She paints in earthy colours, and uses solid and dotted lines in concentric circles to depict the journeys and activities of figures in the story. Peggy Napangardi Jones was born in country around Phillip Creek, north of Tennant Creek. This area is her mangaya (country, Dreaming held from her father). Her mother's Warlpiri country lies between Tennant Creek and Elliot, while her grandmother's Mudpurra country lies further north. Napangardi stayed in her father's country with her family until she was a young woman; 'When I was a kid I was living in the bush - no school...'. Then the family moved out from Phillip Creek and walked to Brunchilly Station, where her mother worked as a servant. Later they moved to Banka Banka Station, moving back and forth between Banka Banka and Brunchilly, living on bush tucker. As a young woman, Napangardi went with her father and mother to Alekerenge where she married a Warumungu man. In 1970 Napangardi and her husband moved to Tennant Creek, where their three children were born. In 1996 Napangardi joined the Julalikari CDEP Women's Art & Crafts Program located in the 'Pink Palace' at Tennant Creek and was introduced to a range of modern mediums, including silk painting, various forms of printmaking, acrylic painting on canvas, and pottery. In 1998-99 three artists were invited to participate in an artist-in-residency program at Julalikari Arts. They were potter Madeleine Meyer, sculptor Alison Clouston and Judy Watson. Through this exchange with artists, Napangardi was encouraged to work with clay and was introduced to wood-carving, just as earlier she had been introduced to silk painting and print making by co-ordinator Alison Alder. In both 1997 and 1998 Napangardi's work was exhibited in the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award and in 1999 she held her first solo exhibition at Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne. In April 2004, Napangardi had to leave Tennant Creek for dialysis treatment in Alice Springs. Source: National Gallery of VictoriaIn her formative years Kathleen walked around the country south of Yakka Yakka with her mother, father, brother and uncle. This included Mangkayi, her father’s country, and Nantalarra and Nakarra Nakarra her mother’s country. They would also travel to Gordon Downs Station for rations of tea, sugar, flour and tobacco. When Kathleen was still a young girl, her family moved into Sturt Creek where she worked in the laundry. It was here that she met her husband, Paddy Paddoon, who was one of the men in the stock camp. She had two daughters at Sturt Creek before they moved on to the old Balgo mission. Kathleen gave birth to her third daughter at the old stables of the mission. The children were placed in the dormitories and Kathleen worked as a gardener and in the kitchen making bread. Kathleen and Paddy would attempt to travel back to Sturt Creek for weekends and holidays with the children as much as possible. This is where their last child, a son, was born. Kathleen commenced painting in the late 1980s and in 2002 began to emerge as a significant artist gaining recognition for her predominately red and white paintings of Nakarra Nakarra (Seven Sisters’ Dreaming) and the country associated with this Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) story. She is a senior Law woman and a custodian of the Nakarra Nakarra (Seven Sisters’ Dreaming) songs and ceremonies from the country south of Yakka Yakka. Kathleen had her first solo exhibition in 2004. EXHIBITIONS 2013 Traversing Borders: Art from the Kimberley, QUT Art Museum, Brisbane, QLD 2012 Warlayirit Artists, Artkelch Pro Community, Frieburg, Grassi Museum Leipzig, Fabrik Der Kunste, Hamburg and Galerie Gunzoburg Bodensee (Lake Constance), GERMANY 2010 Mixed Exhibitions, Palya Art, Melbourne, Sydney, Perth. Source: Warlayirti Artists, Balgo HillsBiography by Ikuntji Artists: Alice was born in 1943 near Talaalpi, which is a swamp near and a little bit to the east of Walungurru on the Western Australian border. Prior to her painting Alice worked for many years at the Kintore School teaching the young girls dancing and the traditions of the desert people. Alice started painting on the “Minyama Tjukurrpa” – the Kintore Haasts Bluff collaborative canvas project. As a painter she is inspired by her rich cultural heritage, and thrives when involved with her stories and lore. Alice is an active “dancing woman” who travels widely to participate in annual ceremonies and “Women’s Law” meetings. Alice’s tjukurrpa is the porcupine or Tjilkamata. Her story is told in bright colours often utilizing orange and yellow to mirror the ochres that are used in ceremonial body painting. In her tjukurrpa story there is often the porcupine scurrying about rock holes and hiding places looking for tucker while nearby the women are themselves hunting, laying in wait for the porcupine. Alice is a keen hunter and likes to go hunting with Eunice Jack. Alice’s father was the late Uta Uta Tjangala, who was one of the original Papunya Tula painters. His Tjukurrpa is Pungkalungka at Takpalangu. Pungkalungka’s are dangerous, and sometimes kill and eat people. They live in huge caves in the hills. Alice only paints the entrance to the caves to signify the unknown danger of the monster that dwells within. Her father’s country is Ngurrapalangu, and her tjukurrpa has passed to her from this place – the porcupine was travelling through the sand hills and passing near the two carpet snakes, kuniya kutjarra, who were living underneath the water. Alice also enjoys the other crafts and is involved in producing hand-spindled hairstring for ceremonies and ininti necklaces and mats. She regularly goes out bush to collect ininti seeds then laboriously pierces them with hot wire to make beads for necklaces, bracelets or mats. COLLECTIONS Aboriginal Art Museum Utrecht, NL Art Gallery of New South Wales, NSW Arts Daustralie Stephane Jacob, Paris, FR Gabrielle Pizzi Collection, Melbourne, VIC Harold Mitchell Foundation, Melbourne, VIC Heide Muesum of Modern Art, Melbourne, VIC Myer Baillieu Collection, de Young Museum, San Fransico, USA National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, ACT National Gallery of Victoria, VIC Parlament House Collection, Canberra, ACT Red Dot Gallery, Singapore Supreme Court of the Northern Territory, Darwin, NT University of Queensland Art Collection, Brisbane, QLD Active Youth Collection, Japan Griffith University, QLD Araluen Art Centre, Alice Springs, NT The Owen and Wagner Collection of Australian Aboriginal Art Helen Read Collection Amy Johnson, who's 'Skin' name is Djirwulurr, speaks the Ritharrngu language in Marrurru, Ngukurr, South East of Arnhem Land. Amy’s paintings have an underlying theme of simplicity – she paints what she sees around her – the day to day happenings in her Country at Ngukurr on The Roper River. She has always lived near the billabongs, the birds, and the buffalo, this is the backdrop to Amy’s world…and an integral part of her cultural and traditional life. The vibrant acrylic colours used by Amy enhances her story of life around the billabongs. She has a passion for colour and uses it to best advantage – her talent shines through in unbelievable skies and storybook trees as her animals and birds travel across her Country. Amy lived at Ngukurr with her husband who was also a well-known artist until he passed away in 2005. She remembers painting at school and being encouraged by her teacher to be an artist – she has painted on and off over the years ever since. During that time Amy has won awards for her paintings and her work is in many private collections and galleries throughout Australia. Source Mimi Aboriginal Art & Craft, Katherine, NTAmy Johnson, who's 'Skin' name is Djirwulurr, speaks the Ritharrngu language in Marrurru, Ngukurr, South East of Arnhem Land. Amy’s paintings have an underlying theme of simplicity – she paints what she sees around her – the day to day happenings in her Country at Ngukurr on The Roper River. She has always lived near the billabongs, the birds, and the buffalo, this is the backdrop to Amy’s world…and an integral part of her cultural and traditional life. The vibrant acrylic colours used by Amy enhances her story of life around the billabongs. She has a passion for colour and uses it to best advantage – her talent shines through in unbelievable skies and storybook trees as her animals and birds travel across her Country. Amy lived at Ngukurr with her husband who was also a well-known artist until he passed away in 2005. She remembers painting at school and being encouraged by her teacher to be an artist – she has painted on and off over the years ever since. During that time Amy has won awards for her paintings and her work is in many private collections and galleries throughout Australia. Source Mimi Aboriginal Art & Craft, Katherine, NTAmy Johnson, who's 'Skin' name is Djirwulurr, speaks the Ritharrngu language in Marrurru, Ngukurr, South East of Arnhem Land. Amy’s paintings have an underlying theme of simplicity – she paints what she sees around her – the day to day happenings in her Country at Ngukurr on The Roper River. She has always lived near the billabongs, the birds, and the buffalo, this is the backdrop to Amy’s world…and an integral part of her cultural and traditional life. The vibrant acrylic colours used by Amy enhances her story of life around the billabongs. She has a passion for colour and uses it to best advantage – her talent shines through in unbelievable skies and storybook trees as her animals and birds travel across her Country. Amy lived at Ngukurr with her husband who was also a well-known artist until he passed away in 2005. She remembers painting at school and being encouraged by her teacher to be an artist – she has painted on and off over the years ever since. During that time Amy has won awards for her paintings and her work is in many private collections and galleries throughout Australia. Source Mimi Aboriginal Art & Craft, Katherine, NTWillie Gudupi and Moima Willie 'Willie Gudabi (1916-1996) was born on Nutwood Downs Station. He grew up in Alawa country, hunting and gathering on the margins of small cattle stations such as St Vidgeon, Bauhinia Downs, Nutwood Downs and Tanumbirini. Before he went to live at Ngukurr, Gudbai worked as a stockman at some of these stations, including Tanumbirini where he was initiated. Gudabi was the custodian of cave art sites in Alawa country, which lies to the west of Mara country, south-west of Ngukurr and directly south of the Roper River. After experimenting with printmaking in 1986, Gudabi and other Ngukurr artists began to paint in acrylic on canvas, often working collaboratively with his wife Moima Willie (Ngalakan born c.1935). He soon developed an elaborate, vibrant style akin to tapestry. A figure that recurs in Gudabi's work is Gurdang - one of the last survivors of the early contact period who left a legacy of rock art in Alawa country and was associated with a secret ceremony central to Gudabi's paintings. Gudabi held his first solo exhibition at William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, in conjunction with Alcaston Gallery in 1990. The following year his work was featured in Aboriginal Art and Spirituality at the High Court in Canberra and in Flash Pictures, an Australian National Gallery travelling exhibition. In 1993, the artist won the Gold Coast City Art Award and the Alice Prize, Alice Springs. The artist's work was featured in Figures in the Land, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1996 and Ngundungunya: art for everyone, NGV, Melbourne, 1997. Moima Willie (b.1935) was born at the Roper River mission where she attended school and worked during the day, gardening and looking after the mission grounds and animals. She was very young when she married Alawa lawman Willie Gudabi (1918-96). As a young wife she lived at Hodgson Downs whilst Gudabi travelled extensively as a successful stockman. From 1987 onwards, Moima, a founding artist of the Ngundungunya Association of Artists Ngukurr, painted with her husband. Their work wasincluded in Aboriginal Art and Spirituality, The High Court of Australia, Canberra, 1991 and in many Ngukurr exhibitions. '
Source National Gallery of Victoria PEGGY PATRICK DIRRMINGALI A prodigious singer, dancer, artist and storyteller, Peggy has performed throughout Australia. Frances Kofod, a linguist who has worked in the East Kimberley since 1971, is collaborating with Peggy on a bilingual autobiography. She believes that Peggy's repertoire of Kimberley song cycles is unparalleled and that her cultural knowledge is akin to an encyclopedia. As well as her commitment to preserving her culture, Peggy has been a formidable politician; representing Gija people on the Kimberley Land Council, serving for nine years as the Chairperson of the Gooda Gooda Community and negotiating for Aboriginal rights on the Argyle Diamond Mine agreement. Born in the East Kimberley around 1930, Peggy has lived through the profound social changes of first contact. Before Peggy was born, her mother witnessed the massacre of her parents (Peggy's grandparents) and other family members by Europeans greedy for the fertile plains of the Kimberley frontier. These stories were passed on to Peggy and other children. In 2010, in recognition of her contribution to culture and for her efforts to bring Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians together, Peggy Patrick was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia. Source: Beth Neate “Peggy Patrick AM: A Queen Among Men”, ABC Open Mother Tongue, 31 July 2014 Willie Gudupi and Moima Willie 'Willie Gudabi (1916-1996) was born on Nutwood Downs Station. He grew up in Alawa country, hunting and gathering on the margins of small cattle stations such as St Vidgeon, Bauhinia Downs, Nutwood Downs and Tanumbirini. Before he went to live at Ngukurr, Gudbai worked as a stockman at some of these stations, including Tanumbirini where he was initiated. Gudabi was the custodian of cave art sites in Alawa country, which lies to the west of Mara country, south-west of Ngukurr and directly south of the Roper River. After experimenting with printmaking in 1986, Gudabi and other Ngukurr artists began to paint in acrylic on canvas, often working collaboratively with his wife Moima Willie (Ngalakan born c.1935). He soon developed an elaborate, vibrant style akin to tapestry. A figure that recurs in Gudabi's work is Gurdang - one of the last survivors of the early contact period who left a legacy of rock art in Alawa country and was associated with a secret ceremony central to Gudabi's paintings. Gudabi held his first solo exhibition at William Mora Galleries, Melbourne, in conjunction with Alcaston Gallery in 1990. The following year his work was featured in Aboriginal Art and Spirituality at the High Court in Canberra and in Flash Pictures, an Australian National Gallery travelling exhibition. In 1993, the artist won the Gold Coast City Art Award and the Alice Prize, Alice Springs. The artist's work was featured in Figures in the Land, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1996 and Ngundungunya: art for everyone, NGV, Melbourne, 1997. Moima Willie (b.1935) was born at the Roper River mission where she attended school and worked during the day, gardening and looking after the mission grounds and animals. She was very young when she married Alawa lawman Willie Gudabi (1918-96). As a young wife she lived at Hodgson Downs whilst Gudabi travelled extensively as a successful stockman. From 1987 onwards, Moima, a founding artist of the Ngundungunya Association of Artists Ngukurr, painted with her husband. Their work wasincluded in Aboriginal Art and Spirituality, The High Court of Australia, Canberra, 1991 and in many Ngukurr exhibitions. '
Source National Gallery of Victoria John Lee Tjakamarra is the son of Donkey Man Lee Tjupurrula, a highly respected and senior cultural custodian in western central Australia. John Lee is a member of Warlayirti Artists in Wirrimanu, Balgo Hills. Jarinyanu David Downs was born in Western Australia near Lake Gregory south of The Kimberley in the Great Sandy Desert. He spoke mainly Wangkajunga and Walmajarri languages and, in his youth, followed his family’s traditional desert dwelling lifestyle. In his early twenties Mr Downs began working on cattle stations in the Fitzroy Crossing area. During the 1960’s Jarinyanu started carving shields, boomerangs and coolamons before, in the 1980’s, picking up paintbrushes, ochres and acrylic paint. During his strong and creative career as an artist he painted in close narrative to his culture such as the rain making Kurtal spirit figures and aerial landscape views embedded with action. An enthusiastic teacher of traditional culture and lessons from the bible, Mr. Downs energy and passion is readily seen in his artwork. Text: Helen Read Describing women painted for ceremony. this work was created during a gathering of senior ladies at a conference south of Halls Creek in Western Austraila, Napangarti first saw kartiya (non-Aboriginal people) when she was about 12 years old, at Ngariyili rockhole near what is now the Balgo airstrip. The kartiya were policemen searching for Aboriginal people. Napangarti was amazed and frightened by the colour of their skin, which was red from the sun, and thought they might have painted themselves with red ochre. There were no men amongst her group, so they began to run away. One Kukatja man, Albert Nagomarra, told them not to be frightened. This is how Napangarti joined mission life at Balgo. Bai Bai Sunfly Napangardi paints regularly at Warlayirti Artists in Wirrimanu, Balgo Hills and was one of the inaugural members of the artistic group known now across the world. Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was born in Pintupi land at Muyinnga, about 100 kilometres west of the Kintore Range, just across the Western Australian border. He is the son of Uta Uta Tjangala’s older brother, Minpuru Tjangala (c.1899–1976). After his initiation into Pintupi law at the site of Yumari, Tjampitjinpa and his younger brother Smithy Zimran Tjampitjinpa walked into the Aboriginal community of Yuendumu. They later joined their parents and other siblings – who had come in to Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) in 1956 from the Dover Hills/Yumari area – at the new settlement of Papunya. Tjampitjinpa worked as a labourer, assisting with the fencing of the aerodromes at Papunya and Ikuntji. He was one of the youngest of the group of men who began painting at the start of the Western Desert art movement in 1971, and was a founder of Paunya Tula Artists. During the 1970s, Tjampitjinpa was preoccupied with returning to his traditional lands and became a strong advocate for the outstation movement, travelling between meetings in Papunya, Yuendumu, Wirrimanu (Balgo) and Mount Doreen Station. His goal was finally achieved with the establishment of the Walungurru (Kintore) settlement in 1981. Tjampitjinpa moved there with his young family in 1983, establishing an outstation at Ininti (Redbank) and serving as chairman of the Kintore Outstation Council. During this period, he emerged as one of Papunya Tula Artists’ major painters, pioneering the bold, scaled-up, linear style that came to dominate many of the Walungurru painters’ work during the 1990s. His distinctive aesthetic preoccupa-tion is exemplified in the untitled works of 1994 and 2001. Now one of the last founding members of Papunya Tula Artists, Tjampitjinpa’s career spans more than 40 years. He has had six solo exhibitions since 1989 in Australia, most recently at Utopia Art, Sydney. Throughout the 1980s Tjampitjinpa worked devotedly on a land claim for Ininti, holding meetings in Darwin, Warmun (Turkey Creek), Utopia and many other places before finally abandoning political involvement as ‘ ... too much humbug for too long’. Tjampitjinpa now wants ‘ … to settle down and work for myself, just painting’, and resides on his out-station when not at Walungurru or in Mparntwe (Alice Springs). Source: Vivien Johnson in 'Tradition today: Indigenous art in Australia’, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2014Ronnie Tjampitjinpa was born in Pintupi land at Muyinnga, about 100 kilometres west of the Kintore Range, just across the Western Australian border. He is the son of Uta Uta Tjangala’s older brother, Minpuru Tjangala (c.1899–1976). After his initiation into Pintupi law at the site of Yumari, Tjampitjinpa and his younger brother Smithy Zimran Tjampitjinpa walked into the Aboriginal community of Yuendumu. They later joined their parents and other siblings – who had come in to Ikuntji (Haasts Bluff) in 1956 from the Dover Hills/Yumari area – at the new settlement of Papunya. Tjampitjinpa worked as a labourer, assisting with the fencing of the aerodromes at Papunya and Ikuntji. He was one of the youngest of the group of men who began painting at the start of the Western Desert art movement in 1971, and was a founder of Paunya Tula Artists. During the 1970s, Tjampitjinpa was preoccupied with returning to his traditional lands and became a strong advocate for the outstation movement, travelling between meetings in Papunya, Yuendumu, Wirrimanu (Balgo) and Mount Doreen Station. His goal was finally achieved with the establishment of the Walungurru (Kintore) settlement in 1981. Tjampitjinpa moved there with his young family in 1983, establishing an outstation at Ininti (Redbank) and serving as chairman of the Kintore Outstation Council. During this period, he emerged as one of Papunya Tula Artists’ major painters, pioneering the bold, scaled-up, linear style that came to dominate many of the Walungurru painters’ work during the 1990s. His distinctive aesthetic preoccupa-tion is exemplified in the untitled works of 1994 and 2001. Now one of the last founding members of Papunya Tula Artists, Tjampitjinpa’s career spans more than 40 years. He has had six solo exhibitions since 1989 in Australia, most recently at Utopia Art, Sydney. Throughout the 1980s Tjampitjinpa worked devotedly on a land claim for Ininti, holding meetings in Darwin, Warmun (Turkey Creek), Utopia and many other places before finally abandoning political involvement as ‘ ... too much humbug for too long’. Tjampitjinpa now wants ‘ … to settle down and work for myself, just painting’, and resides on his out-station when not at Walungurru or in Mparntwe (Alice Springs). Source: Vivien Johnson in 'Tradition today: Indigenous art in Australia’, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2014Gravel airstrips make for smooth landings ...Born 24th September 1966. Paints at Milikapiti, Melvillie Island, Tiwi Isles, Northern Territory Conrad Tipungwuti was born in his home country of Ranku on Melville Island. Tipungwuti’s painting reflects the influence of Tiwi cultural tradition. His painting focuses Tapara, the moon man and the late wet season Kulama initiation ceremony, celebrated when the sacred yams become ripe on the island. In 2013, he was a finalist in the Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards at the Art Gallery of Western Australia. Tipungwuti’s Skin group is Arrinkuwunila (stone) Dance: Tarranigi (buffalo) Solo Exhibitions 2012 Conrad Tipungwuti - Chasing Dots – Seva Frangos Art, Perth, WA 2013 Aboriginal and Pacific art, Sydney, NSW Group Exhibitions 1997 Old Patterns Framed Gallery Darwin NT 1997 Old Tiwi. Alcaston House Gallery Melbourne, Vic 1997 Kartukuni Amintiya Jurra (Ironwood and Paper) Hogarth Gallery, Paddington NSW 1998 The Old and the New, Gallery Gondwana Alice Springs NT 1998 Ngawa Mantawi Mossenson Gallery Subiaco WA 1998 Group exhibition Alcaston House, Melbourne, Vic 1998 Jilamara Mossenson Gallery, Subiaco WA 1999 All About Art, Alcaston Gallery, Canberra, ACT 1999 Tiwi on Wood, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne, Vic 1999 New Paintings from Milikapiti, Redback Gallery, Brisbane, QLD 1999 Art of the Tiwi Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT 2000 Ngawiyati Mgapamurrumi - We Work Together Textiles show at Craft Victoria, Melbourne, Vic 2001 Jilamara Jilamara Framed Gallery, Darwin, NT 2001 Island Images Australian Print Workshop, Melbourne, Vic 2002 Pwoja Jilamara Raft Artspace, Darwin, NT 2003 Let’s Keep Our Art Strong: Recent works from the Jilamara Artists, Raft Artspace, Darwin, NT 2005 Yirrarra – Kulama amintiya Pukumani, Alcaston Gallery, Melbourne, Vic 2006 Nginingaji ngawula kurrupuranji Jilamara, RAFT Artspace, Darwin, NT 2006 Yirrajirrima murrakupuni ngawurraningimarri, Tiwi Art Network, Darwin, NT 2006 Jilamara: new etchings from Melville Island, Northern Editions, Darwin, NT 2006 Jilamara: new etchings from Melville Island, Northern Editions, Alison Kelly Gallery Melbourne, Vic 2006 Jilamara works on paper, Sofitel, Melbourne, Vic 2007 Red, Yellow, Black, White, Raft Artspace, Darwin, NT 2007 Earth on Paper 1, Seva Frangos Art, Perth, WA 2008 Yimwarlini, Raft Art Space, Darwin, NT 2009 Earth on Paper 2, Seva Frangos Art, Perth, WA 2009 Mukumuwu, To Be Together, Tiwi Art Network, Darwin, NT 2009 Wulikija Jilamara, Northern Editions, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT Source: Seva Frangos Art, Western Australia Napanangka was Born C.1940 at Lupul, Frederick Range in the Northern Territory. Eunice paints at Ikuntji Art Centre in the Haasts Bluff community Northern Territory

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