The Palya Art Online Gallery

Palya Art holds commercial exhibitions of works by emerging and established artists through Indigenous managed Art Centres.

These artworks are for sale. For purchases, please send your request to Helen Read

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Contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details please or go to helen@palya.com.auPlease contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.auOn view in Melbourne: Please contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.auTimothy Cook was born in 1958 and lives and works at Milikapiti on Melville Island. His country is Goose Creek, Melville Island, his skin group Marntupuni (House Fly) and dance Tarduwuli (Shark). A member of Jilamara Arts & Crafts Association, he began exhibiting his work in the late 1990s. Featuring circular and cross motifs, Cook’s paintings are strongly connected to aspects of Tiwi ceremonial practice, particularly the Kulama (yam ceremony) and Pukumani (funeral ceremony), as well as stories of Purukapali, one of the great mythological Tiwi ancestral figures. ... Cook has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally. In 2012 Cook won the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award and was a finalist in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. He was a finalist in the Togart Contemporary Art Award, Darwin (2010 and 2013); Kate Challis RAKA Award, Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (2013); Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth (2009 and 2011); Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award (2006); and the Shell Fremantle Print Award, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2002). His paintings are represented in numerous major public and private collections in Australia and internationally. Source Museum of Contemporary Art SydneyOn view in Melbourne. Please contact Helen Read through the website contact form for more details or go to helen@palya.com.auTimothy Cook was born in 1958 and lives and works at Milikapiti on Melville Island. His country is Goose Creek, Melville Island, his skin group Marntupuni (House Fly) and dance Tarduwuli (Shark). A member of Jilamara Arts & Crafts Association, he began exhibiting his work in the late 1990s. Featuring circular and cross motifs, Cook’s paintings are strongly connected to aspects of Tiwi ceremonial practice, particularly the Kulama (yam ceremony) and Pukumani (funeral ceremony), as well as stories of Purukapali, one of the great mythological Tiwi ancestral figures. ... Cook has exhibited widely in Australia and internationally. In 2012 Cook won the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Award and was a finalist in 2004, 2005, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011. He was a finalist in the Togart Contemporary Art Award, Darwin (2010 and 2013); Kate Challis RAKA Award, Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (2013); Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards, Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth (2009 and 2011); Xstrata Coal Emerging Indigenous Art Award (2006); and the Shell Fremantle Print Award, Fremantle Arts Centre, Perth (2002). His paintings are represented in numerous major public and private collections in Australia and internationally. Source Museum of Contemporary Art SydneyMabel Juli was born circa 1933 at Five Mile, near Moola Boola Station south of Warmun, Western Australia and her language is Gija. As a young woman, she moved to Springvale Station, Bow River Station and Bedford Downs. Juli is the sister of Rusty Peters who is also an accomplished artist working at Jirrawun Arts in Wyndham. Mabel Juli is a senior Warmun artist; she is a strong Lore and Culture woman and an important ceremonial singer and dancer. Mabel Juli started painting in the mid 1980s, at the same time as well-known Warmun artists Queenie McKenzie who taught her to paint and Madigan Thomas. These female artists were encouraged to paint by Rover Thomas. Juli is a dedicated, innovative artist who continues to paint using earth pigments on canvas. She primarily paints the Ngarrangkarni (Dreaming) stories of her country Darrajayin, which is also covered largely by Springvale Station. As a young girl, Mabel Juli’s mother and father would often take her to their traditional lands; it was here that they taught her their stories Karnkiny (Moon Dreaming), Glingennayn and Old Woman Singing Out for Her Dog (Marranji and Jiyirinny) that also feature in her work. Source Gallery Gabrielle Pizzi A senior Gija man of Jungurra skin, Rammey Ramsey was born at Old Greenvale Station, which is now part of Bow River Station. His country is the area west of Bedford Downs near Elgee Cliffs. His Gija name Warlawoon is the general name for that area.   Rammey began painting for Jirrawun Arts in 2000 and continues to paint with Warmun Art Centre.   In addition to his painting, Rammey is also an inspired actor, dancer and teacher who performed in the Neminuwarlin Performance Group’s production of ‘Fire, Fire Burning Bright’, which featured in the Perth and Melbourne International Arts Festivals in 2002. In 2014, he was a finalist in the Alice Art Prize and recently exhibited in the project and touring exhibition ‘In the Saddle, On the Wall’.   Source: Warmun Art Centre  This Tjukurrpa (Dreaming) tells about the bush turkey. It is a big bird that flies around from place to place searching for food. They eat insects. The men hunt for the turkeys with boomerangs. The men hunt together to catch the turkeys. Warnayaka Artists with Lily Hargraves. ... Painting and singing; performance, the land and Law, are all connected, as Lily Yirringali Jurrah Nungurrayi Hargraves shows us in this, her articulating ‘Turkey Dreaming’ painting, above. A recent painting of Mrs. Hargraves, now in her late 80's Lily Nungarrayi Yirringali Jurrah Hargraves is a Walpiri artist and senior Law woman from Lajamanu in the Northern Territory. Lily was known as Maggie Jurrah Hargraves but prefers now to be known as Jurrah and best known as Lily Hargraves. Her Warlpiri name is Yirringali. Text Helen ReadJohn Lee Tjakamarra is the son of Donkey Man Lee Tjupurrula, a highly respected and senior cultural custodian in western central Australia.Jarinyanu David Downs was born in Western Australia near Lake Gregory south of The Kimberley in the Great Sandy Desert. He spoke mainly Wangkajunga and Walmajarri languages and, in his youth, followed his family’s traditional desert dwelling lifestyle. In his early twenties Mr Downs began working on cattle stations in the Fitzroy Crossing area. During the 1960’s Jarinyanu started carving shields, boomerangs and coolamons before, in the 1980’s, picking up paintbrushes, ochres and acrylic paint. During his strong and creative career as an artist he painted in close narrative to his culture such as the rain making Kurtal spirit figures and aerial landscape views embedded with action. An enthusiastic teacher of traditional culture and lessons from the bible, Mr. Downs energy and passion is readily seen in his artwork. Text: Helen Read Phyllis Thomas was born at a place called Riyarr on the Turner River, south east of Purnululu. When young she worked on Turner Station looking after poultry, gardening, grinding salt and carting water from the well. However she often preferred to run away into the bush with the old women to hunt, collect dingo scalps and look for gold.   Phyllis is a Gija woman of Nagarra skin whose bush name, Booljoonngali, means ‘big rain coming down with lots of wind’. She began painting when Freddie Timms set up the Jirrawun Aboriginal Arts group in 1998, and today she continues to paint with Warmun Arts.   Her work has been acquired by a number of collectors and galleries, including a special focus purchase of five paintings by the Art Gallery of Western Australia (AGWA) in 2000.   © Warmun Art CentreA prodigious singer, dancer, artist and storyteller, Peggy Patrick Dirrmingali (AM) has performed throughout Australia. Frances Kofod, a linguist who has worked in the East Kimberley since 1971, is collaborating with Peggy on a bilingual autobiography. She believes that Peggy's repertoire of Kimberley song cycles is unparalleled and that her cultural knowledge is akin to an encyclopedia. As well as her commitment to preserving her culture, Peggy has been a formidable politician; representing Gija people on the Kimberley Land Council, serving for nine years as the Chairperson of the Gooda Gooda Community and negotiating for Aboriginal rights on the Argyle Diamond Mine agreement. Born in the East Kimberley around 1930, Peggy has lived through the profound social changes of first contact. Before Peggy was born, her mother witnessed the massacre of her parents (Peggy's grandparents) and other family members by Europeans greedy for the fertile plains of the Kimberley frontier. These stories were passed on to Peggy and other children. In 2010, in recognition of her contribution to culture and for her efforts to bring Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians together, Peggy Patrick was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia. Source: Beth Neate “Peggy Patrick AM: A Queen Among Men”, ABC Open Mother Tongue, 31 July 2014 Born c1936 Springvale Station, southwest of Warmun, Western Australia works Warmun, Western Australia Language: Gija Rusty Peters is a senior Gija man of Juwurru skin. He grew up on Springvale Station, southwest of Warmun, where he learnt traditional law and worked as a stockman. In the mid-1980s, Peters moved to Warmun with other senior Gija artists where he helped to form the art school. In 1989 he moved to Kununurra and while there undertook print making and painting classes. In 1997 Peters based his practice at Jirrawun Aboriginal Arts Group, and has since engaged with the Warmun Art Centre. This continual movement through his country is key to Peters’ development as an artist and has honed his ability to map and narrate story and Country. Text AGWA “Phyllis Thomas was born at a place called Riyarr on the Turner River, south east of Purnululu. When young she worked on Turner Station looking after poultry, gardening, grinding salt and carting water from the well. However she often preferred to run away into the bush with the old women to hunt, collect dingo scalps and look for gold.   Phyllis is a Gija woman of Nagarra skin whose bush name, Booljoonngali, means ‘big rain coming down with lots of wind’. She began painting when Freddie Timms set up the Jirrawun Aboriginal Arts group in 1998, and today she continues to paint with Warmun Arts.   Her work has been acquired by a number of collectors and galleries, including a special focus purchase of five paintings by the Art Gallery of Western Australia (AGWA) in 2000.   © Warmun Art CentreA prodigious singer, dancer, artist and storyteller, Peggy Patrick Dirrmingali (AM) has performed throughout Australia. Frances Kofod, a linguist who has worked in the East Kimberley since 1971, is collaborating with Peggy on a bilingual autobiography. She believes that Peggy's repertoire of Kimberley song cycles is unparalleled and that her cultural knowledge is akin to an encyclopedia. As well as her commitment to preserving her culture, Peggy has been a formidable politician; representing Gija people on the Kimberley Land Council, serving for nine years as the Chairperson of the Gooda Gooda Community and negotiating for Aboriginal rights on the Argyle Diamond Mine agreement. Born in the East Kimberley around 1930, Peggy has lived through the profound social changes of first contact. Before Peggy was born, her mother witnessed the massacre of her parents (Peggy's grandparents) and other family members by Europeans greedy for the fertile plains of the Kimberley frontier. These stories were passed on to Peggy and other children. In 2010, in recognition of her contribution to culture and for her efforts to bring Indigenous and non- Indigenous Australians together, Peggy Patrick was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia. Source: Beth Neate “Peggy Patrick AM: A Queen Among Men”, ABC Open Mother Tongue, 31 July 2014 This rare large format Elcho Island painting comes framed with pale timber beneath a high quality non-reflective perspex glassThis rare large format Elcho Island painting comes framed with pale timber beneath a high quality non-reflective perspex glassThis rare large format Elcho Island painting comes framed with pale timber beneath a high quality non-reflective perspex glass

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